Carnival of the Blue #39

You want it? Come and get it, Punk.

It is my pleasure to host this month’s edition of the Carnival of the Blue. I absolutely love the ocean, and I am impressed with how well my fellow bloggers are able to convey their own genuine sense of maritime wonder through writing. Without further ado, let’s put on our mask and fins and dive headlong into the best of July’s ocean blogging…

Mike Lisieski has a great review about Cephalopod polarization vision on his new-ish, but awesome, blog: Cephalove. I feel a little dirty linking to something about Cephs other than videos of them getting demolished by mantis shrimp.

John at A DC Birding Blog, brings us a post and a couple photos about a research program tracking a beach-nesting shorebird, the Piping Plover. Bonus: Adorable Plover chicks.

David Shiffman (WhySharksMatter) at Southern Fried Science celebrates the 4th of July with a great post about the early history of marine biology in the US of A. Pioneering American naturalists Agassiz and Bache support the strong correlation between awesome facial hair and awesome science.

Speaking of great facial hair, Dr. M at Deep Sea News brings us an article about a fish that can rock one mean stache. Unsurprisingly, the lady-fish are helpless to resist the allure of such refined, unadulterated manliness – err fishliness.

Kevin Z, also at Deep Sea News, injects some science into a news story about a Lions Mane Jellyfish that broke up and stung 100 different people on a New Hampshire beach: Thus becoming the single most exciting event in the state’s history.

POE Zen Faulkes at NeuroDojo reports on some sloppy popular science fear mongering and lazy taxonomy surrounding a recent study about the effects of various drugs on an Amphipod Crustacean.

Chuck at Ya Like Dags? raises a series of questions about fishery management and the dogfish and skate populations in Georges Bank, a crucial American fishery. Could population increases be the result of invading Canucks?

Here is a second contribution from David Shiffman; read this article before you start feeling too warm and fuzzy about dolphin-safe tuna. Find out about the monumental hidden costs of keeping non-endangered dolphins out of tuna nets.

Angelo Villagomez at Saipan Blog takes us on a guided tour of the Smithsonian’s offsite collections warehouse in Silver Springs (a true naturalist’s Mecca). He finds that it differs considerably from Dan Brown’s depiction of the facility in his novel, The Lost Symbol.

Speaking of the Smithsonian, here is the first ever Carnival of the Blue submission from their new Ocean Portal Blog. Christine Hoekenga sees though popular misconceptions, and tells us why sharks should be revered rather than feared.

Susannah, at the Wanderin’ Weta Blog visits Canada’s Crescent Beach to brave the Molluscan hordes. Don’t panic, and remember to bring a towel so you can clean up after the snail orgies and parasitic flatworms.

Hannah Waters at Culturing Science contributes an excellent article about dimethylsulfide (DMS). She uses awesome hand drawn figures to illustrate this inconspicuous compound’s integral entanglement with ocean ecology.

Al at Deep Type Flow goes for a swim with a Whale Shark, and shares with us the feeling of pure wonder that he experiences. His dance with a giant highlights the sense of awe that grounds so many of us in marine science.

Finally, you can check out some photos and videos I took of two species of mantis shrimp: Gonodactylus platysoma and Gonodactylus chiragra. I am especially proud of the slow-motion video of G. chiragra striking the wall and knocking himself across the tank.

The next edition of the Carnival of the Blue will be hosted by Angelo at the Saipan Blog. The theme for his carnival will be ‘Carnival of the Blue XL: Top of the Food Chain Edition’, and he is looking for posts about predation, especially by sharks. Start submitting your great ocean blogging to the Carnival of the Blue automatic submission form.

Thank’s once more for allowing me to host this great carnival. I hope to see you all again soon, out in the Wild Blue.

Photo: Kate Feller

8 Comments

  1. Jason R August 4, 2010 8:09 pm Reply

    Thanks for posting. I missed your video before. Man, those mantis are wonderfully squicky critters.

    http://cephalopodcast.com

  2. WhySharksMatter August 5, 2010 7:24 am Reply

    Hey, Mike! Thanks for a great Carnival!

    Just a quick note- while I submitted the “Ya Like Dags” post, it was written by Chuck. I’m just a fan, not the author.

    http://southernfriedscience.com

  3. WhySharksMatter August 5, 2010 7:25 am Reply

    Whoa… Angelo is looking for posts about sharks? I think I can provide some of those.

    http://southernfriedscience.com

  4. lisieski August 7, 2010 12:19 am Reply

    I hate to do this to you, but I’m moving my blog and would like it if you’d link to the new one. The post on cuttlefish vision will now be located at http://cephalove.southernfriedscience.com/?p=32 .

    Good carnival! I got very excited about the mantis shrimp video before I realized I had already seen it :( Moar, plz?

  5. Susannah August 10, 2010 3:50 am Reply

    Great carnival! I’ve been on vacation, so I hadn’t had a chance to read it; nice to come home to.

    http://www,wanderinweeta.blogspot.com

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